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Diabetes and Dementia

Some of the latest studies show the link between blood glucose control and Alzheimer's

Scientists discover strong link between diabetes and Alzheimer's: Drugs used to control glucose levels may halt progression of dementia

Fiber is more powerful than we thought: Scientists find whole grains could be pivotal to controlling blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics

 

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New research by Rutgers University has found fiber plays a far more active role than ever recorded in nurturing the gut bacteria that control blood sugars and fats.


Miami is on red alert after 11th person catches the mosquito-borne dengue fever

Miami is on high alert for dengue fever after an eleventh person in the city caught the mosquito-borne illness.   

Residents are being urged to protect themselves from the insects by wearing long sleeves when outdoors and spraying insect repellent. 

Officials also advised draining water from their yards and turning over anything holding water such as buckets and plant pots, where mosquitoes like to breed. 

Miami-Dade County officials have issued a high risk health alert after an eleventh person contracted dengue fever (file)

Miami is on red alert after 11th person catches the mosquito-borne dengue fever

Miami is on high alert for dengue fever after an eleventh person in the city caught the mosquito-borne illness.   

Residents are being urged to protect themselves from the insects by wearing long sleeves when outdoors and spraying insect repellent. 

Officials also advised draining water from their yards and turning over anything holding water such as buckets and plant pots, where mosquitoes like to breed. 

Miami-Dade County officials have issued a high risk health alert after an eleventh person contracted dengue fever (file)

Everyone recommends flossing – but there's hardly any proof it works

It’s one of the most universal recommendations in all of public health: floss daily to prevent gum disease and cavities.

Except there’s little proof that flossing works.

Still, governments, dental organisations and manufacturers of floss have pushed the practice for decades. Dentists provide samples to their patients; the British Dental Association insists on its patient website that flossing helps “in the battle against tooth decay and gum disease”.

But all this could change following an investigation by Associated Press (AP). Last year journalists from the agency asked the departments of health and human services and agriculture in the US for their evidence that flossing works.

Since then, the US government has quietly dropped the recommendation, admitting that there is no scientific evidence to prove the benefits. And now the NHS is set to review their own guidelines. 

On its website, it currently states that dental floss “helps to prevent gum disease by getting rid of pieces of food and plaque from between your teeth” which can cause inflammation. 

A leading British dentist, however, said there is only “weak evidence” that flossing helps in this way. Professor Damien Walmsley of Birmingham University, said the time and expense required for reliable studies meant the health claims often attributed to floss were unproven. Read more


Anthrax a powerful weapon in fight against cancer?

image from www.studyfinds.orgBladder cancer kills roughly 16,000 Americans annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Moreover, it is among the most expensive cancers to treat, and most current treatment methods are invasive and uncomfortable. Patients often must sit constantly for hours while their bladder is filledwith a substance intended to kill cancer cells and tumors. However, a team of researchers from Purdue University say they have formulated a new method of bladder cancer treatment, and it involves an ingredient that you probably weren’t expecting: anthrax.

Anthrax often conjures up images of decaying, infected animal carcasses for some, or it may stir fears of biological warfare and terrorist threats for others. But now it may be used to help heal, rather than hurt, incredibly. The study’s authors say they have created a way to combine the anthrax toxin with a specialized growth factor that only targets bladder cancer cells and tumors.   MORE


LIVE ORGAN HARVESTING AN INEVITABILITY FOR MILLENNIALS

The New World of 1984!

UPDATED! Virginia gynecologist, 69, is arrested for allegedly performing hysterectomies and tying women's fallopian tubes without their consent

UPDATE:

173 women come forward to claim they are victims of gynecologist, 69, accused of performing hysterectomies and tying fallopian tubes without consent as he is held without bail

Original Story below:

A Virginia gynecologist removed fallopian tubes and performed hysterectomies on several patients without their consent, federal authorities are alleging.

Javaid Perwaiz, 69, was arrested on Friday after a year-long FBI investigation found that he was ‘performing unnecessary surgeries on unsuspecting patients,’ according to papers filed with the Eastern District of Virginia.

The bureau received a tip from a hospital employee who first suspected Perwaiz, according to ABC News.

According to the indictment, patients would tell hospital staff that they were visiting for their ‘annual clean outs’.

Javaid Perwaiz, 69, appears in a police booking photo after he was arrested by law enforcement agencies in Virginia on Friday

In reality, however, they were subjected to a range of procedures that they did not know about in advance.  In one case, Perwaiz allegedly asked one patient repeatedly whether she was planning to have another baby.

After the patient went to a fertility specialist in 2014, Perwaiz told her that ‘both Fallopian tubes were burnt down to nubs, making natural conception impossible.’

According to court documents, Perwaiz removed the woman’s Fallopian tubes without her consent or knowledge.

In another case, Perwaiz is alleged to have performed a full hysterectomy on a woman who was under the impression that she would only have her ovaries removed.

In a four-year period starting in 2014, Perwaiz performed surgery on 510 patients - 42 per cent of whom underwent at least two operations, according to records
 

In a four-year period starting in 2014, Perwaiz performed surgery on 510 patients - 42 per cent of whom underwent at least two operations, according to records

The woman told authorities that she was ‘shocked’ to discover that Perwaiz listed the hysterectomy as ‘elective surgery’ on her medical record.

When the woman consulted with another doctor, she was told that there were less invasive procedures available to her, according to the indictment.

On October 19, Perwaiz is said to have performed a number of procedures on a woman, including an abdominal supracervical hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and lysis of adhesions.

The patient later told investigators that these procedures were done on her even though she never complained of pain in her pelvic region - contrary to what Perwaiz wrote in a medical chart dated September 30.

Federal authorities also allege that Perwaiz performed annual D and C surgeries (Dilation and curettage) based on a diagnosis of endometriosis, a condition in which tissue that normally lines the uterus grows outside of it.

Perwaiz is also alleged to have treated her for an ectopic pregnancy.

A review of Medicaid claims from his patients found that some of them were subjected to the same surgery on an annual basis.

In a four-year period starting in January 2014, Perwaiz was found to have performed surgery on 510 patients - with 42 per cent of them having undergone at least two operations.

The review also found that Perwaiz had a 'propensity to conduct bundled surgeries' that included laparoscopy, dilation and curettage, and lysis of adhesions. 

Prosecutors also allege that Perwaiz defrauded insurance companies by claiming fictitious ailments and charging health care providers for false claims.

He was arrested on Friday and has been held since at Western Tidewater Regional Jail in Suffolk, Virginia.

His lawyer has not commented on the allegations.

Records also show that Perwaiz has been investigated for medical malpractice.    MORE


New blood test 'detects breast cancer years before symptoms'

image from www.studyfinds.org
NOTTINGHAM, United Kingdom — Early detection is very important when it comes to treating breast cancer. The sooner the disease is identified, the greater a patient’s prognosis and chances of recovery. With this in mind, a new, simple blood test currently being developed in the United Kingdom may be a significant game changer in the fight against breast cancer. Researchers believe the test will be capable of detecting breast cancer up to five years before any actual clinical signs or symptoms show themselves.

The test works by identifying the body’s natural immune responses to tumor cell-produced substances. Cancer cells produce harmful proteins in the body called tumor-associated antigens. These antigens in turn trigger the immune system to create antibodies to fight the proteins, called autoantibodies.

Recently, scientists at the University of Nottingham established that these tumor-associated antigens, or (TAAs), can be used as accurate indicators of a developing tumor in its early stages. So, they identified and indexed a group of TAAs that are specifically produced by breast cancer, and designed a blood test that will look to detect these TAAs within samples taken from patients.   MORE


Experimental drug for type 2 diabetes lowers blood sugar and aids weight loss

1An experimental type 2 diabetes drug can lower blood sugar and aid weight loss in obese mice with the condition.  Scientists from Monash University in Australia injected the mice every day for a week with a protein they created called IC7Fc.   IC7Fc targets the gp13 receptor, which is found on many cells in the human body and is known to influence metabolism.   By the end of the week, the mice lost weight, ate less and had reduced blood-sugar levels, the researchers found. 

The weight loss came from reducing the body fat of the mice without affecting their muscle mass.  The scientists claim no existing type 2 diabetes drug has the same benefits. They are now seeking funding for human trials.

IC7Fc was made by combining two different signalling proteins found in humans.    When injected into obese mice, the animals lost fat, ate less and saw their blood sugar levels go down.

'Control' mice, which were obese and diabetic, were just fed less and injected with a saline solution.  

Although the controls lost fat, they also saw their muscle mass go down. 

If IC7Fc's benefits also occur in humans, elderly patients in particular may benefit, the scientists claim. This is due to them already being at risk of reduced muscle mass.  The mice that received IC7Fc also had less fat build-up in their livers. Metformin has been shown to have the same effect.   Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease often occurs in patients who are overweight or obese, including type 2 diabetics, according to Diabetes.co.uk. Left untreated, it can cause severe liver damage and even failure. 

In a second part of the experiment, IC7Fc's safety was tested in human cells in the laboratory and in monkeys. The drug did not trigger inflammation or an immune response, the study found.

Read the entire article HERE

 


Most U.S. dairy cows are descended from just 2 bulls

 

Unlike most dairy cows in America, which are descended from just two bulls, this cow at Pennsylvania State University has a different ancestor: She is the daughter of a bull that lived decades ago, called University of Minnesota Cuthbert. The bull's frozen semen was preserved by the U.S. Agriculture Department.

Dan Charles/NPR

Chad Dechow, a geneticist at Pennsylvania State University who studies dairy cows, is explaining how all of America's cows ended up so similar to each other.

He brings up a website on his computer. "This is the company Select Sires," he says. It's one of just a few companies in the United States that sells semen from bulls for the purpose of artificially inseminating dairy cows.

Dechow chooses the lineup of Holstein bulls. This is the breed that dominates the dairy business. They're the black-and-white animals that give a lot of milk.

Dairy farmers can go to this online catalog and pick a bull, and the company will ship doses of semen to impregnate their cows. "There's one bull — we figure he has well over a quarter-million daughters," Dechow says.

The companies rank their bulls based on how much milk their daughters have produced. Dechow picks one from the top of the list, a bull named Frazzled. "His daughters are predicted to produce 2,150 pounds more milk than daughters of the average bull," he says, reading from the website.   MORE>>>>>


Why 'Medicare for All' is a pipe dream

image from encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comMedicare has already become a system to be gamed. A Medicare patient went to an optometrist for new glasses, knowing that glasses are not covered under Medicare. When asked for an insurance card, she said she did not have insurance for glasses, but they wanted the Medicare card anyway.She had a rather comprehensive examination, was given a new prescription for lenses and proceeded to choose her frames and pay for her new glasses.

Several months later, she received a “Medicare Summary Notice for Part B.” Medicare was billed $817.09, approved $552.07, and paid out $432.82. The patient was told that the maximum she may be billed would be $110.41, or 20 percent of the approved amount. She never received a bill.

Rather shocked at those numbers, she looked more closely at the charges that were approved:

Eye and medical exam for diagnosis and treatment, new patient: $147.01
Photography of content of eyes: $20.41
Examination of right eye by ophthalmoscope with retinal drawing: $26.01
Examination of left eye by ophthalmoscope with retinal drawing: $26.01
Photography of the retina: $58.17
Microscopic evaluation of deep cells of the eye: $40.24
Ultrasound of eye disease, growth, or structure (right): $79.79
Ultrasound of eye disease, growth, or structure (left): $79.79
Measurement of field of vision during daylight conditions: $74.64

TOTAL for CLAIM APPROVED: $552.07
TOTAL PAID by Medicare: $432.82

All this for a healthy, asymptomatic patient who just needs new glasses! It is clear that Medicare has become a cash cow for enterprising “providers.” This does not appear to be fraud, just creative billing for services that were not asked for and probably not needed. Medicare was willing to pay, but the self-paying patient might have been content with item No. 1 only, unless it revealed a cause for concern. And what is No. 6? An ophthalmoscope is a microscope for examining the deeper structures (see Nos. 3 and 4), and a slit lamp is a microscope for looking at the structures in front. All eye examinations by an eye doctor would routinely include these for both eyes every time.

Read more at https://www.wnd.com




Do you need to go gluten free? The 12 little-known signs you have coeliac disease

For this year’s Coeliac Awareness Week which runs from the 14th to the 20th of May, an expert has revealed the twelve signs and symptoms of the disease which should never be ignored.

Head to Instagram and you’ll find over 14 million #glutenfree posts.

This is no surprise when you realise that over 500,000 people in the UK alone are believed to suffer from coeliac disease without knowing it.

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition which means your body decides that healthy cells are foreign and so it sends antibodies out to ‘protect’ your body.

During this process, antibodies are released that damage the lining of their gut and can cause a number of unpleasant symptoms, which aren't all tummy-related.   The problem with coeliac disease, director of Coeliac UK, Norma McGough, tells Healthista, is that it often goes undiagnosed or misdiagnosed.

Coeliac disease is an autoimmune condition which causes the body to trigger an immune response to gluten when it is eaten, which damages the lining of the small intestine

Ms McGough explains: ‘It’s a common disease with a prevalence of about one in 100 in the UK but we’ve only got one-quarter of those people currently medically diagnosed.’ 

This means that there are still around half a million people in the UK who have coeliac disease but don’t know it.


Chronic pain drives millions of Americans to suicide

The hidden cost to the war on pain killers!  This is the result when politicians meddle into our health care system, forcing the needy to go to the streets looking for pain killers!  FAKE NEWS has over-reported on pain killing drugs, as well as the hope cannabis would be to millions!

Chronic pain from cancer, arthritis, and other conditions drives millions of people to suicide every year, a new report warns. 

1.jpgThe mortal implications of pain have been widely discussed in recent years since the opioid epidemic showed painkillers can drive anyone to overdose, whether intentionally or not. 

But a new report by the CDC warns overdoses account for a minority of deaths among people who suffer from chronic pain. 

In recent years, the number of chronic pain patients intentionally taking their own lives has soared, with most cases committed using a firearm. 


Why Some Doctors Purposely Misdiagnose Patients

Hundreds of people say a Michigan doctor falsely diagnosed them with epilepsy. He wouldn’t be the first to lie to patients about how sick they are.

JAN HAVICKSZ STEEN / FINE ART IMAGES / HERITAGE IMAGES / GETTY

Cases like Awaad’s are especially fraught because differing diagnoses of the same patient are common in health care; it’s where the term second opinioncomes from. Often, the only way a misdiagnosis is discovered is if a patient has another specialist check a doctor’s work. Even then, it’s not always clear whether a wrong diagnosis was intentional or not. As Louis Saccoccio, the head of the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association, put it to me, “People rely so much on physicians’ professionalism that when that trust is violated, it’s a tough thing to catch.”

Sparrow speculated that doctors cheat the system because “they believe they won’t get caught, and mostly they don’t get caught.” There’s also the fact that doctors often do know more than their patients about various diseases. Sometimes, fraudulent doctors lord that knowledge over patients who get suspicious. In 2015, Farid Fata was sentenced to 45 years in prison for administering unnecessary chemotherapy to 553 patients. “Several times when I had researched and questioned his treatment, he asked if I had fellowshipped at Sloan Kettering like he had,” one of his patients, Michelle Mannarino, told Healthcare Finance.

The most devious doctors, who will harm their patients to line their pockets, make headlines. But in a way, even honest doctors are incentivized to err on the side of excessive care. Most doctors work on a fee-for-service basis, meaning the more they bill insurance plans, the more they earn. Some states and hospitals are trying to avoid this situation by experimenting with paying doctors a fixed amount. But that, Sparrow said, creates the opposite problem: It means doctors are incentivized to do less. Ideally, in his view, there wouldn’t be incentives either way. “I don’t want a doctor who is richer for treating me more or richer for treating me less,” he said. “I want a doctor who is on a salary.”   Read the entire article here

The REAL reason America's 'Frankenchickens' have to be washed with chlorine

The disturbing prospect of chlorine-washed chickens from the US going on sale in British shops in a post-Brexit trade deal last year sparked an explosive row at the heart of Government.

But beyond the politics lies the story of why American poultry needs such drastic chemical treatment – and of the horrendous conditions at the farms where they are bred and reared.

Now whistleblower farmers have revealed the full horror of the suffering to The Mail on Sunday, including how:

  • Tens of thousands of super-sized 'Frankenstein' birds are crammed in vast warehouses.
  • The chickens, which weigh up to 9lb, often buckle under their weight and must live without natural sunlight.
  • Chickens frequently die before they reach maturity and many are left covered in their own faeces, turning warehouses into vile breeding grounds for disease.

Unlike in the UK and Europe, there are no minimum space requirements for breeding chickens in the US. America also does not have any rules governing lighting levels in the sheds and, crucially, its farms have no maximum allowed level of ammonia, which indicates how much urine and faecal matter is present. This means there is no limit on how much can fester inside the sheds.

There is no legal requirement to wash US chickens in chlorine or other disinfectants, but 97 per cent of its birds are cleaned in this way after slaughter.

Packed in: Chickens at the North Carolina farm run by Craig Watts. He says their flesh would rot due to the conditions


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4742712/Why-chickens-washed-chlorine.html#ixzz4oK4HwazF 


DEA Releases New Drug Overdose Death Figures: Guns Safer than Prescription Drugs.

I ran this in 2015..... Legal drugs kill more people than guns - but the war on the second amendment rages on!

DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg today announced results from the 2015 National Drug Threat Assessment (NDTA), which found that drug overdose deaths are the leading cause of injury death in the United States, ahead of deaths from motor vehicle accidents and firearms. In 2013, more than 46,000 people in the United States died from a drug overdose and more than half of those were caused by prescription painkillers and heroin.
These are 2013 numbers, so let’s compare to other causes of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

deaths1

A drug overdose, with a death rate of 13.9 per 100,000, is almost four times as common as a cause of death than gun homicides (3.6 per 100,000). Death from prescription drugs (7.2 per 100,000) is twice as common as gun homicides.

Those are the total numbers. If you prefer your stats in the often used format of x per 100,000, here you go:

Obviously, homicides aren’t exactly a leading cause of death in the US, and gun homicides, even less so. Accidental death by firearms (0.2 per 100,000) is a small blip.

deaths2

For all those concerned parents who think little Johnny is likely to get gunned down on the street would be better advised to keep tabs on their prescription painkillers, as Johnny is far more likely to die from popping those than from any gun in your house or in the hands of a school mate.

And, of course, one is almost three times as likely to die in an auto accident (death rate of 10.7 per 100,000) than as a result of a homicide.

MORE


Vegetarian diets not always the most climate-friendly, researchers say

Many climate activists and scientists have called for a shift to plant-based diets to keep climate change in check and reduce deforestation, since producing red meat requires a lot of land for grazing and growing feed.

Agriculture, forestry and other land use activities accounted for nearly a quarter of man-made greenhouse gas emissions from 2007-2016, the U.N. climate science panel said in a flagship report last month.

But there is no one-size-fits-all solution, said Keeve Nachman, assistant professor at the Baltimore-based Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, who led the study on diets.

In low- and middle-income countries such as Indonesia, citizens on average need to eat more animal protein for adequate nutrition, he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

That means diet-related heat-trapping emissions and water use in poorer

countries would need to rise to reduce hunger and malnutrition, while high-income countries should reduce their consumption of meat, dairy and eggs, the study said.    MORE


Man, 55, whose penis 'split' due to infected tumours has his member 'reconstructed' with Manuka honey

A man whose penis had split due to tumours had his member reconstructed using Manuka honey, doctors have revealed.

The unnamed 55-year-old, from Roskilde in Denmark, went to his GP when his foreskin became too tight to pull back.

Non-cancerous tumours, which were infected, were found on 'all segments of the penis'. These were causing the skin to split, known as penile denudation.

Medics removed the masses and attempted to reconstruct the penis via a skin graft, which failed.

His penis was 'completely healed' 52 days later, the team of medics wrote in the International Journal of Surgery Case Reports.

A man whose penis was split had his genitals reconstructed using Manuka honey (stock)

Many wounds have benefited from Manuka honey, which has anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and healing properties, the doctors wrote.

They hope it will soon have a 'permanent place in the physician's arsenal of wound-treatment products'.

Mr Tet Yap, consultant urologist at The Princess Grace Hospital, part of HCA UK, told MailOnline: 'Manuka honey contains a naturally-occurring enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide. 

MORE


Why the world is becoming more allergic to food

A child being tested for different allergiesImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES

The increase in allergies is not simply the effect of society becoming more aware of them and better at diagnosing them.

Around the world, children are far more likely than ever before to develop food allergies.

Inquiries into the deaths of British teenagers after eating buttermilk, sesame and peanut have highlighted the sometimes tragic consequences. Last year, a six-year-old girl in Western Australia died as the result of a dairy allergy.

The rise in allergies in recent decades has been particularly noticeable in the West. Food allergy now affects about 7% of children in the UK and 9% of those in Australia, for example. Across Europe, 2% of adults have food allergies.

Life-threatening reactions can be prompted even by traces of the trigger foods, meaning patients and families live with fear and anxiety. The dietary restrictions which follow can become a burden to social and family lives.

While we can't say for sure why allergy rates are increasing, researchers around the world are working hard to find ways to combat this phenomenon.   MORE


Plant-based diets could come with health risks

The Plain Truth has been reporting on the dangers of Vegan diets for years now...

Photo
Photo (c) AlexRaths - Getty Images

As consumers look to incorporate more eco-friendly habits into their daily routines, a new study evaluated the effectiveness of making the switch to a plant-based diet. 

According to researchers, though there are health and environmental benefits, many of these diet plans are depriving consumers of nutrients that are vital to brain functioning. 

“This is...concerning given that current trends appear to be towards meat reduction and plant-based diets,” said Dr. Emma Derbyshire. 

Getting the proper nutrients

Continue reading "Plant-based diets could come with health risks" »


Metformin used to treat cancer- More effective than Chemo?

Could cheap drugs (up to a century old) be the new way to tackle cancer?

As a GP, Lisa McGrath had always considered herself healthy, but then, at 42, she found a lump in her breast, and was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. It was, as Lisa recalls seven years later, a complete shock. 'I have never smoked and hardly drink,' she says. 'I run regularly and the most overweight I've ever been is by 7-10lb. I have had four babies, all breastfed, and I have no family history of breast cancer.' The cancer had spread into her left armpit and into most of the lymph nodes. 'It had grown in a sheet rather than a tight ball - a type of tumour that's harder to detect and is often bigger when it's found,' she says.


Superbug C. difficile is evolving to 'spread in hospitals-living off Western Diet!

The superbug Clostridium difficile (C.diff) may be evolving to spread in hospitals, research suggests.  Scientists from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine discovered the bacteria, which can cause diarrhoea, is gradually 'splitting' into two species.  The new bug spreads easily, is 'immune' to disinfectants and thrives on the Western diet of sugary foods, they found.

It is thought to have emerged thousands of years ago and may be responsible for more than two-thirds (70 per cent) of the C.diff infections in hospitals today.  The researchers hope understanding how C.diff adapts to 'changes in human lifestyles' will lead to better infection control.

The superbug Clostridium difficile (C.diff) is evolving to spread in hospitals (stock)
The superbug Clostridium difficile (C.diff) is evolving to spread in hospitals (stock)

'Our large-scale genetic analysis allowed us to discover that C. difficile is forming a new species with one group specialised to spread in hospital environments,' co-lead author Dr Nitin Kumar said.

'This emerging species has existed for thousands of years, but this is the first time anyone has studied C. difficile genomes in this way to identify it. 

'This particular bacteria was primed to take advantage of modern healthcare practices and human diets, before hospitals even existed.'    MORE


Medical Mistake Killed Neil Armstrong

STORY AT-A-GLANCE

  • In 2012, Armstrong, aged 82, underwent heart surgery at Mercy Health Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio. He died two weeks later. His two sons insisted his death was caused by medical error
  • An anonymous source leaked documents to the press showing the hospital paid the Armstrong family a $6 million malpractice settlement. The sender hoped bringing the information to light might help save lives
  • When nurses removed the wires for Armstrong’s temporary pacemaker, he began to bleed. Armstrong was brought into the catheterization lab for evaluation rather than straight to the operating room — a nonstandard decision that cost him his life
  • Armstrong’s case is a perfect example of the indiscriminate nature of lethal medical errors; 19% of elderly patients are injured by medical care in the U.S., and those injured have nearly double the death rate compared to those who receive proper treatment
  • July 20, 2019, we celebrated the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. In a riveting three-part documentary series, PBS explores the space race that led to American astronauts becoming the first men to set foot on the moon

Read More:  Mercola.com


Want local meat? Tell Congress to pass the PRIME Act

NOTE:  Please help small farmers and rancher survive!  This LAW NEEDS TO BE PASSED!

Want local meat? Tell Congress to pass the PRIME Act

https://www.westonaprice.org/ want-local-meat-tell-congress- to-pass-the-prime-act/

 

image from www.lopezclt.orgAs consumer desire for local, grass-fed meat grows, it’s increasingly difficult for farmers to meet the demand due to a shortage of government-inspected slaughterhouses. 

Current federal law bans the sale of meat to consumers unless it has been processed in a USDA-inspected facility or under a state inspection program with the exact same standards as the USDA facilities.  These regulations are designed for the large, industrial-scale processors, and they are too expensive and difficult to meet for most small-scale processors who work with local farmers.

With few slaughterhouses available to small farmers, many have to haul their animals for several hours, resulting in increased expenses, higher prices for consumers, and unnecessary stress on the transported animals.

“Custom” slaughterhouses, for which states can set their own inspection standards, do exist, and many farmers already have much closer access to one of these facilities. But current federal law provides that these facilities may only process meat for the person or persons who owned the animal when the slaughter took place. This means the customer(s) must buy the whole animal while it is still alive – buying a large amount of meat all at one time, without even knowing how much meat they’ll end up with or what their price per pound will be.  This is not feasible for most farmers or consumers!

H.R. 2859/ S.1620, known as the PRIME Act, addresses this problem by repealing the federal ban on the sale of meat from custom slaughterhouses.  The bill allows states to set their own standards for the sale of meat within the state processed at a custom slaughterhouse.

The PRIME Act is a win-win-win: we can increase farmers’ incomes, increase consumer access to locally raised meat, reduce federal regulations on small businesses, cut down on fossil fuel use, and improve animal welfare.

 

Continue reading "Want local meat? Tell Congress to pass the PRIME Act" »


Legalize Milk, Real Milk

An MP3 audio file of this article, narrated by the author, is available for download.

Mark Thorton
Lew Rockwell

Got Milk?

Most Americans think they drink milk on a regular basis. In fact, virtually all these people are consuming pasteurized milk, not milk. Milk in its natural state – raw milk – is consumed by very few Americans, because it is illegal in many states and thoroughly discouraged by federal health organizations, regulators, and the Big Dairy lobby.

Raw milk is prohibited in Canada and Australia, although raw milk and raw-milk products are legal almost everywhere else. In fact, in countries with the best cuisines, such as France, raw milk and raw-milk products are considered the high-quality choice.