Bob Barney- The hidden meaning of songs, movies,etc Feed

Who Said This?

By Bob Barney

Trolling Facebook, I often laugh at the NEVER TRUMPERS who love to poke fun of the stupidity of Donald Trump.  Yet the stupid guy, turned the smartest guy in the world Obama's economy around in 1 week!  But just to keep things even who said the following dumb things. All were either presidents, or would be pretenders to the throne...

1

1). I am a Jelly Donut (when speaking German to a Berlin Crowd)

2.) She announced that her secretary of education would have to be approved first by a child “trans person.”

3.) "Who is that?" Looking at a bust of George Washington... He was Veep at the time.

4.) "I've now been in 57 states? I think one left to go."  Running 4 Prez

5.). "A man I'm proud to call my friend. A man who will be the next President of the United States—Barack America!"

6.) “Our enemies are innovative and resourceful, and so are we. They never stop thinking about new ways to harm our country and our people, and neither do we.” 

7.) Since we know only Trump talked dirty in the WH, who said this? "I want loyalty! I want him to kiss my ass in Macy’s window at high noon and tell me it smells like roses. I want his pecker in my pocket.”

8.) What Prez “took a crap, then shaved and showered, all the while continuing his conversation as though what he was doing was the most normal thing in the world.”

9. "I did not have sexual relations with that woman." and "That depends on what the meaning of 'is' is."

10.) "I've looked on a lot of women with lust. I've committed adultery in my heart many times."

11.) “I don’t know what the fuck to do about Vietnam.”

12.) "You know, I always wondered about that taping equipment but I'm damn glad we have it, aren't you?"

13.) "Who is going to find out? These women are trash. Nobody's going to believe them." 

14.) "I'm not going to have some reporters pawing through our papers. We are the president."

15.)   "At least I don't plaster on the makeup like a trollop, you c*nt." 

16.) "R-S-P-E-C-T." --flubbing the spelling of Aretha Franklin's famous song "Respect" 

17.) "But she is a typical white person, who, if she sees somebody on the street that she doesn't know, you know, there's a reaction that's been bred in our experiences that don't go away and that sometimes come out in the wrong way, and that's just the nature of race in our society."

18.) "There's just no such thing as truth when it comes to him. He just says whatever sounds good and worries about it after the election."
Presidential candidate Bill Clinton describing his opponent, George Bush (Quoted in the American Spectator, 10/28/92) 

19.) "the purpose of government is to rein in the rights of the people"

20.) “I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races … I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of Negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races from living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be a position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race.”

 

 

ANSWERS!

 

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The Pledge of Allegiance A Short History

My thoughts: I thought I would include this little piece of history for those people who watch FOX News and just are never given the facts. Fair and balanced yes, factual? Not always. You see, the original pledge was written by a minister, a LIBERAL, a socialist who hated what he saw when it came to bigotry and hatred, fueled by the Civil War.  In many ways, I think he tried to make a short statement that every American could honor.  So please understand that George Washington never said "under God" when he recited the pledge, because he never heard of it! Neither did Jefferson, Jackson, Lincoln, Grant or Custer!  America by 1892 was a far different nation than our forefather's founded.

The Pledge of Allegiance A Short History

by Dr. John W. Baer

Copyright 1992 by Dr. John W. Baer

Francis Bellamy (1855 - 1931), a Baptist minister, wrote the original Pledge in August 1892. He was a Christian Socialist. In his Pledge, he is expressing the ideas of his first cousin, Edward Bellamy, author of the American socialist utopian novels, Looking Backward (1888) and Equality (1897).

Francis Bellamy in his sermons and lectures and Edward Bellamy in his novels and articles described in detail how the middle class could create a planned economy with political, social and economic equality for all. The government would run a peace time economy similar to our present military industrial complex.

The Pledge was published in the September 8th issue of The Youth's Companion, the leading family magazine and the Reader's Digest of its day. Its owner and editor, Daniel Ford, had hired Francis in 1891 as his assistant when Francis was pressured into leaving his baptist church in Boston because of his socialist sermons. As a member of his congregation, Ford had enjoyed Francis's sermons. Ford later founded the liberal and often controversial Ford Hall Forum, located in downtown Boston.

In 1892 Francis Bellamy was also a chairman of a committee of state superintendents of education in the National Education Association. As its chairman, he prepared the program for the public schools' quadricentennial celebration for Columbus Day in 1892. He structured this public school program around a flag raising ceremony and a flag salute - his 'Pledge of Allegiance.'

His original Pledge read as follows: 'I pledge allegiance to my Flag and (to*) the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.' He considered placing the word, 'equality,' in his Pledge, but knew that the state superintendents of education on his committee were against equality for women and African Americans. [ * 'to' added in October, 1892. ]

Dr. Mortimer Adler, American philosopher and last living founder of the Great Books program at Saint John's College, has analyzed these ideas in his book, The Six Great Ideas. He argues that the three great ideas of the American political tradition are 'equality, liberty and justice for all.' 'Justice' mediates between the often conflicting goals of 'liberty' and 'equality.'

In 1923 and 1924 the National Flag Conference, under the 'leadership of the American Legion and the Daughters of the American Revolution, changed the Pledge's words, 'my Flag,' to 'the Flag of the United States of America.' Bellamy disliked this change, but his protest was ignored.

In 1954, Congress after a campaign by the Knights of Columbus, added the words, 'under God,' to the Pledge. The Pledge was now both a patriotic oath and a public prayer.

Bellamy's granddaughter said he also would have resented this second change. He had been pressured into leaving his church in 1891 because of his socialist sermons. In his retirement in Florida, he stopped attending church because he disliked the racial bigotry he found there.

What follows is Bellamy's own account of some of the thoughts that went through his mind in August, 1892, as he picked the words of his Pledge:

It began as an intensive communing with salient points of our national history, from the Declaration of Independence onwards; with the makings of the Constitution...with the meaning of the Civil War; with the aspiration of the people...

The true reason for allegiance to the Flag is the 'republic for which it stands.' ...And what does that vast thing, the Republic mean? It is the concise political word for the Nation - the One Nation which the Civil War was fought to prove. To make that One Nation idea clear, we must specify that it is indivisible, as Webster and Lincoln used to repeat in their great speeches. And its future?

Just here arose the temptation of the historic slogan of the French Revolution which meant so much to Jefferson and his friends, 'Liberty, equality, fraternity.' No, that would be too fanciful, too many thousands of years off in realization. But we as a nation do stand square on the doctrine of liberty and justice for all...

If the Pledge's historical pattern repeats, its words will be modified during this decade. Below are two possible changes.

Some prolife advocates recite the following slightly revised Pledge: 'I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all, born and unborn.'

A few liberals recite a slightly revised version of Bellamy's original Pledge: 'I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with equality, liberty and justice for all.'


The Tramp on the Street

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BY BOB BARNEY

Almost 2,000 years ago, the very God who made the universe, earth, and life on this earth was horribly murdered by His creation, after by a miracle He became a human being, sent to this earth from heaven to find a way around mankind's fate.  We know the story, and the purpose of redemption for our sins is not the point of this article.  There is another message in the death of Jesus, and more human one.  In one of his many lessons which we read in Matthew 25 starting on verse 31-Jesus said, “The Son of Man will come again in his great glory, with all his angels. He will be King and sit on his great throne. 32All the nations of the world will be gathered before him, and he will separate them into two groups as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33The Son of Man will put the sheep on his right and the goats on his left.

34“Then the King will say to the people on his right, ‘Come, my Father has given you his blessing. Receive the kingdom God has prepared for you since the world was made. 35I was hungry, and you gave me food. I was thirsty, and you gave me something to drink. I was alone and away from home, and you invited me into your house. 36I was without clothes, and you gave me something to wear. I was sick, and you cared for me. I was in prison, and you visited me.’
 
37“Then the good people will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry and give you food, or thirsty and give you something to drink? 38When did we see you alone and away from home and invite you into our house? When did we see you without clothes and give you something to wear? 39When did we see you sick or in prison and care for you?’
 
40“Then the King will answer, ‘I tell you the truth, anything you did for even the least of my people here, you also did for me.’
 
41“Then the King will say to those on his left, ‘Go away from me. You will be punished. Go into the fire that burns forever that was prepared for the devil and his angels. 42I was hungry, and you gave me nothing to eat. I was thirsty, and you gave me nothing to drink. 43I was alone and away from home, and you did not invite me into your house. I was without clothes, and you gave me nothing to wear. I was sick and in prison, and you did not care for me.’
 
44“Then those people will answer, ‘Lord, when did we see you hungry or thirsty or alone and away from home or without clothes or sick or in prison? When did we see these things and not help you?’
45“Then the King will answer, ‘I tell you the truth, anything you refused to do for even the least of my people here, you refused to do for me.’
 
46“These people will go off to be punished forever, but the good people will go to live forever.”

Jesus is telling us by this story to always look out for those who haven't had the choices or the luxuries that we have had.  Help those in need, and give to those who ask of you.  Jesus was aware of the needy then, as God, he knows now.  An act of kindness to a stranger who needs your help will go a long way in heaven.  Remember that tramp you see on the street may be experiencing the same hatred that Jesus suffered. That bum or homeless vet was once young, once had a mother who loved them, and once had maybe what you have today. The following are lyrics written by Hank Williams, that aptly remind us of this, for our day!

A Tramp on the street: (Hank Williams)

Only a tramp was Lazarus sad fate
He who lay down at the rich man's gate
He begged for some crumbs from the rich man to eat
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was some mother's darlin', he was some mother's son
Once he was fair and once he was young
Some mother once rocked him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
Jesus, He died on Calvary's tree
Shed His life's blood for you and for me
They pierced His side, His hands and His feet
And they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was Mary's own darlin', he was God's chosen Son
Once He was fair and once He was young
Mary, she rocked Him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
If Jesus should come and knock on your door
For a place to come in, or bread from your store
Would you welcome Him in, or turn Him away
Then the God's would deny you on the Great Judgement Day.
Only a tramp was Lazarus sad fate
He who lay down at the rich man's gate
He begged for some crumbs from the rich man to eat
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was some mother's darlin', he was some mother's son
Once he was fair and once he was young
Some mother once rocked him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
Jesus, He died on Calvary's tree
Shed His life's blood for you and for me
They pierced His side, His hands and His feet
And they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was Mary's own darlin', he was God's chosen Son
Once He was fair and once He was young
Mary, she rocked Him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
If Jesus should come and knock on your door
For a place to come in, or bread from your store
Would you welcome Him in, or turn Him away
Then the God's would deny you on the Great Judgement Day.
Only a tramp was Lazarus sad fate
He who lay down at the rich man's gate
He begged for some crumbs from the rich man to eat
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was some mother's darlin', he was some mother's son
Once he was fair and once he was young
Some mother once rocked him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left him to die like a tramp on the street.
Jesus, He died on Calvary's tree
Shed His life's blood for you and for me
They pierced His side, His hands and His feet
And they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
He was Mary's own darlin', he was God's chosen Son
Once He was fair and once He was young
Mary, she rocked Him, her darlin' to sleep
But they left Him to die like a tramp on the street.
If Jesus should come and knock on your door
For a place to come in, or bread from your store
Would you welcome Him in, or turn Him away
Then the God's would deny you on the Great Judgement Day.

Read more: Hank Thompson - The Tramp On The Street Lyrics | MetroLyrics 


'Amazing Grace'—The story behind one of the best-loved songs of all time

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By Bob Barney from SOURCE

In our second story in the new topic, The Hidden Meaning in many song, movies and books, we come to Amazing Grace.  That so-called "Sunday" gospel classic. The story behind this song is truly amazing indeed.

Many are probably not familar with the song's history. But the Rest of the story behind this tune that was written almost two and a half centuries ago in 1772, by an Englishman named John Newton. Knowing the story of John Newton and the journey he went through before writing the hymn will help to understand the depth of his words and his gratefulness for God's truly amazing grace.

Having lived through a rather unfortunate and troubled childhood (his mother passed away when he was just six years old), Newton spent years fighting against authority, going so far as trying to desert the Royal Navy in his twenties. Later, abandoned by his crew in West Africa, he was forced to be a slave to a slave trader but was eventually rescued. On the return voyage to England, a severe storm hit and almost sank the ship, prompting Newton to begin his spiritual conversion as he cried out to God to save them from the storm.

Ironically, upon his return to England, Newton became a slave ship master, a profession in which he served for several years. Bringing slaves from Africa to England over multiple trips, he admitted to sometimes treating the slaves abhorrently. In 1754, after becoming violently ill on a sea voyage, Newton abandoned the slave trade, and seafaring, altogether, wholeheartedly devoting his life to God's service.

He was ordained as an Anglican priest in 1764 and became quite popular as a preacher and hymn writer, penning some 280 hymns, among them the great "Amazing Grace," which first appeared in the Olney Hymns, printed by Newton and poet/fellow writer William Cowper. It was later set to the popular tune NEW BRITAIN in 1835 by William Walker.

In later years, Newton fought alongside William Wilberforce, leader of the parliamentary campaign to abolish the African slave trade. He described the horrors of the slave trade in a tract he wrote supporting the campaign and lived to see the British passage of the Slave Trade Act 1807.

And now, we see how lyrics like:

I once was lost,
but now am found,
Was blind
but now I see.

and

Through many dangers, toils, and snares
I have already come.
'Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.

carry a much deeper meaning than a sinner's mere gratitude. Close to death at various times and blind to reality at others, Newton would most assuredly not have written "Amazing Grace" if not for his tumultuous past. And many of us would then be without these lovely words that so aptly describe our own relationship with Christ and our reliance on God's grace in our lives:

'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved;
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed.

Modern interpretations

Those who have read Harriet Beecher Stowe's classic African American novel, Uncle Tom's Cabin, may remember that Tom sings three verses of "Amazing Grace," including one verse not written by Newton, which is now traditionally sung as the final verse:

When we've been there ten thousand years,
Bright shining as the sun,
We've no less days to sing God's praise,
Than when we first begun.

A movie, "Newton's Grace" tells the story of the man behind the poem, and below a representation of that beautiful poem as a song.....

 

 


God's Meanings, in Songs, Movies and everyday life

But the ending always comes at last
Endings always come too fast
They come too fast But they pass too slow

It's a fine line between the darkness and the dawn
They say in the darkest night, there's a light beyond

Death.... A sobering thought, but a topic that concerns everyone alive.  For the most part, everyone's life is going to end badly. I'm not being funny or sarcastic, but The Plain Truth is that most deaths are not pretty, they tend to be dramatic to everyone around the event.  Even when a 100 year old grandmother dies, her entire living family grieves, especially if that death ended in painful agony for weeks, even months.

This idea first came to me when my father died, some 21 years ago.  I was not aware until the day I showed up at the hospital back home in Connecticut that he was going to die in just a few days.  I was shocked to find this out.  However, the next five or six days were pure agony for me.  To watch my father die was horrifying.  Suffering with him at night, as he fought to live.  That week seemed like eternity to me.  Dying may come too quickly in our life, but the act of dying seems to go on and on in agony....

The song "All I know," had already been a favorite to me, as a love song, but after dad's death, it had much more meaning to me.  The agony our lives, which goes by so swiftly and we become old before we realize it. We all have witnesses watching our life zoom by so quickly, then to find it ends terribly, in a slow agonizing death. In my case, I pray my death comes quickly, but odds are it will not.  Most likely I like most,  will have to endure such an end, or endure our loved ones go through the process.  A sad thought.  

God knows the sting of death, and God also knows that death is an enemy of mankind.

Paul writes in 1 Corinthians about death and the only hope for mankind.... The resurrection of the dead, WHEN JESUS COMES!

1 For 15:45---The Scriptures tell us, “The first man, Adam, became a living person.”But the last Adam—that is, Christ—is a life-giving Spirit. 46. What comes first is the natural body, then the spiritual body comes later. 47 Adam, the first man, was made from the dust of the earth, while Christ, the second man, came from heaven. 48 Earthly people are like the earthly man, and heavenly people are like the heavenly man. 49 Just as we are now like the earthly man, we will someday be likei the heavenly man.

50 What I am saying, dear brothers and sisters, is that our physical bodies cannot inherit the Kingdom of God. These dying bodies cannot inherit what will last forever.

51 But let me reveal to you a wonderful secret. We will not all die, but we will all be transformed! 52 It will happen in a moment, in the blink of an eye, when the last trumpet is blown. For when the trumpet sounds, those who have died will be raised to live forever. And we who are living will also be transformed. 53For our dying bodies must be transformed into bodies that will never die; our mortal bodies must be transformed into immortal bodies.

54Then, when our dying bodies have been transformed into bodies that will never die,j this Scripture will be fulfilled:

“Death is swallowed up in victory.k

55O death, where is your victory?

O death, where is your sting?l

56For sin is the sting that results in death, and the law gives sin its power. 57But thank God! He gives us victory over sin and death through our Lord Jesus Christ.

58So, my dear brothers and sisters, be strong and immovable. Always work enthusiastically for the Lord, for you know that nothing you do for the Lord is ever useless.

Sad as death is, Christ came and died for our sins, and to give us eternal life!  Yes the bitterness of death is coming, but sweet victory follows! The songs says: "It's a fine line between the darkness and the dawn - They say in the darkest night, there's a light beyond."   Yes, it's the darkest before the coming of the sun in the morning, as it will the darkest for us when we die, but the light of Christ will shine again in our eyes!   Come dear Jesus! We need you to rule this earth.