What's Wrong with the Ten Commandments?

By Bob Barney

Ten-commandments-nivBelieve it or not, your neigbor may not believe that the Ten Commandments are important anymore. We read almost every week where some group is forced to take down the Ten Commandments from some public square or building, but when you question many Christians today, they claim that Jesus did away with the Law and the Ten Commandments when he died. They get this crazy idea from some misunderstood quotes from the Apostle Paul. One is:"For sin shall not be master over you, for you are not under law but under grace." Romans 6:14. They try to use this to try and prove an argument that Christians are not under the Law, but under grace.

So for you I ask, which of the Ten Commandments is it OK for me to break, as A CHRISTIAN. I mean just in case Jesus was wrong, when he stated... " Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven. Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works?  And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity (Lawlessness- breaking God's Laws)". Yes, I realize that Jesus claims that many good Christians, who did not follow the Law will be rejected by Him when he returns, but maybe He was in error. (look and read Matthew chapter 7)

Or John was probably also in error when he wrote: "Whosoever committeth sin transgresseth also the law: for sin is the transgression of the law." 1 John 3. Or again, when he wrote: 
"He that saith, I know him, and keepeth not his commandments, is a liar, and the truth is not in him." Or when Jesus said to the rich man who asked him, “Good Teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?” (Notice by the way that Jesus didn't tell him he already had eternal life, it was just a question if he was going to live it out in heaven or hell); "to answer your question, you know the commandments: ‘You must not murder. You must not commit adultery. You must not steal. You must not testify falsely. You must not cheat anyone. Honor your father and mother.’" (For you biblical illiterates out there, Jesus is citing some of the Ten Commandments here). Maybe Jesus, John, Peter and ALL of the Old 
Testament prophets didn't get the memo from God yet that the Ten Commandments were to be abolished, but I ask again this question... Which of these Commandments is it OK to break and remain a Christian?

I will present the Ten out of order:

“I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before Me." So I guess we can now worship other Gods?

“You shall not steal." I guess many Christian ministers are glad this has been done away with, I know Democrats are.

“You shall not commit adultery."  Thank God, I can screw whomever I love!  I can be a queer, or a whoremonger!

“You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor."   This really helps trial lawyers remain perfect Christians- and polictians too!

“Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you."  Most of us today are very happy for this reversal. Our parents are always wrong anyways, just ask any teenager- or your own teenager!

“You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and fourth generations of those who hate Me, but showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My Commandments."  Catholics especially are glad that this has been done away with, IN FACT they have their own 10 Commandments and leave this entire one out! Proof? HERE read this link

“You shall not covet your neighbor's house; you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor's.”  Man, now it's OK to work on stealing your neighbor's wife away from that louse, otherwise known as her husband.... 

“You shall not murder."  I wonder if those Christians think now that I can kill them and stay faithful to God....

“You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain."  I mean, everyone has to be happy that this one is gone right? You God Damn right it is! 

“Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it."  OOPS!  Now this is the only one you really have a problem with after all, isn't it?  BE HONEST with YOURSELF!

So you see, friends, if you claim the Law is abolished, you are only talking about the Sabbath Day. The day Jesus said he is LORD over. The day He said pray that your flight will not occur on (proving that the Sabbath is still in force during the End Times), the only day God has ever sanctioned! We are always to follow all of God's Law, but thanks be Jesus Christ, when we do break the laws today, we are no longer under the death penalty!  We are freed from the penalty when we realize our sin and REPENT (turn and follow the law again) and accept forgiveness.  It's just that simple!  Read your Bible, especially the words in RED!

The Plain Truth's Red Letter Bible- NEW UPDATED KINDLE VERSION!


HEADLINES & STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD: Week-46 2020

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HEADLINES & STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD: Week-46
2020
Nov 22-28
Thanksgiving Week
Turkeycar
News Stories from Across The World:
Black Friday:

The Black Friday bonanza has begun across the United States with shoppers lining up across parts of the country as retailers pin their hopes on a surge after months of slumping sales and businesses toppling into bankruptcy amid the COVID-19 pandemic.  In normal times, Black Friday is the busiest shopping day of the year, drawing millions of shoppers eager to get started on their holiday spending. But these are not normal times: The economy is tanking and crowds are expected to be dramatically diminished as COVID-19 cases spike across the county and shoppers do more of their purchases online.   From Walmart Inc to Best Buy, retailers have overhauled Black Friday shopping, with some assigning clerks in orange vests to serve as traffic cops, taking shoppers' temperatures and offering 'grab-and-go' merchandise, including toys, bikes and kitchen appliances to discourage lingering in store aisles. The lines were already forming late on Thanksgiving night and early this morning across the country with shoppers camping out in the likes of La Grange, Kentucky and Orlando, Florida.

 
 
THURSDAY: HAPPY THANKSGIVING!
 
Wednesday:
Tuesday:
Monday:
Sunday:
 
 

Do the Pilgrims Still Matter?

The 400th anniversary of the Mayflower’s landing finds Plimoth Plantation—and all Americans—wrestling with a complicated history.

    
2.00 avg. rating (46% score) - 4 votes

Editor’s note: The living history museum known as Plimoth Plantation for more than 70 years announced this summer it would change its name to reflect its commitment to telling both the English and Native American stories equally. Shortly before press time, the new name was confirmed as Plimoth Patuxet Museums. Patuxet is the Wampanoag name for the Plymouth area.


The scene in Plymouth Harbor on June 13, 1957, when the Mayflower II arrived from England.

Peter J. Carroll/AP Images

The Mayflower sits calmly at anchor, its sails furled after a long voyage. Around it, a crush of smaller boats fills Plymouth Harbor, jockeying for position, vying to be the closest. The photograph is old and grainy, but it’s clear what’s happening on the shoreline. Thousands of people stand at the water’s edge, pressed cheek to jowl, shouting, cheering, celebrating.

“This is the scene we want to re-create,” Kate Sheehan tells me.

She takes the photo from my hand and places it atop the small mountain of promotional materials that is threatening to snap her desk in two. We are at Plimoth Plantation in Plymouth, Massachusetts, where as the associate marketing director Kate has spent the past several years preparing for 2020, the 400th anniversary of the Pilgrim landing. The highlight of the museum’s celebrations will be the return of its Mayflower replica from a restoration stint at Mystic Seaport in Connecticut. Kate wants the crowd to be no less than the 25,000 who greeted the ship when it first sailed into the harbor, in 1957.

This is before, of course.

It’s March 4, and as Kate guides me through the museum’s visitor center, I can’t help but question whether people will really show up for the Pilgrims in 2020. As American icons, the Pilgrims have lost much of their shine over the past several decades. The days of elementary school pageants—with half the kids in buckle hats and the others in feather headdresses—are mostly over. The Pilgrims’ story once bound the country together; now it is a source of division. If 25,000 people turn out for the Mayflower, I wonder, how many will be there to protest?

The building is buzzing with activity as the staff prepares for its spring opening. Workers are painting the walls in those muted colors we’ve come to think of as “colonial.” In the gallery, curators are putting the finishing touches on an exhibit highlighting the findings of a new archeological dig in town. And in a large hall, the museum’s army of interpreters are gathered for their spring conference, a series of lectures and workshops where they hone their peculiar craft.

Plimoth Plantation is a living history museum. Its grounds are dominated by an authentic re-creation of Plymouth as it would have looked in 1627. Each of the “Pilgrims” you find there is an interpreter role-playing an actual historical figure. From 9 to 5 they live and breathe the 17th century. They will talk your ear off about what life was like in Holland, the rottenness of the Church of England, or the temperament of their rare-breed sheep, but they will not break character, no matter how many times you ask to take a selfie with them.

I slip into the back row and listen to a delightfully madcap workshop titled “Accent Your Accent.” Joshua Bernard, the museum’s resident linguist, is pleading with his coworkers to erase the present progressive tense from their minds. Tacking -ing to the end of a verb simply wasn’t done in the early 17th century. The Pilgrims never would have found themselves walking to the market. “You shall to the market go!” he implores.

He brings up two young interpreters, a woman and a man, and has them act through a scene, improv comedy–style. Deal with a crying baby, he instructs. “That baby … ought not cry in my presence,” the man stammers. “The baby to God should cry out his praise!” the woman replies.

The crowd laughs. To the kinds of history buffs who role-play Pilgrims for a living, this is comedy gold. Still, beneath the levity, there’s an undercurrent of stress among the staff. This year is going to be different. It’s going to be bigger and more intense.

Even in a normal year, the history they teach is a lightning rod. The 400th anniversary will draw only more scrutiny. To some people the Pilgrims represent American ruggedness, religious freedom, and democracy; to others they represent colonialism, white supremacy, and the genocide of Native Americans. In truth, they were a little bit of all of these things, but complex stories do not hold up well in a culture war. The Pilgrims are no longer just historical figures, they’re symbols—and a symbol must stand for something.

“Civilization has made of their landing place a shrine,” President Calvin Coolidge declared during the 300th anniversary celebration of the Pilgrims’ arrival on these shores.

Library of Congress - Prints & Photographs Division

The museum does its best to stay above the fray. The interpreters take a just-the-facts-ma’am approach to history and avoid editorializing. Plimoth Plantation is more than happy to tell you what the Pilgrims were like, but it lets you make up your own mind about what the Pilgrims mean.

This approach sets the museum up as a kind of Pilgrim Switzerland—not neutral, per se, but noncombatant. That said, when you’re dressed from head to toe as a 17th-century Puritan separatist, you’re going to draw some fire.

After the workshop, I catch up with Joshua and ask him how he’s feeling about the coming year. “It hits me in waves,” he says. Still, he’s mostly excited. He believes what they do at the museum is important, and he’s been interpreting for so long he knows how to get through a tough conversation.

“Stand firm when people try to reject history around you,” he says, “but also allow yourself to be enough of the bad guy to show that [the Pilgrims] also were not perfect.”

At the end of the day, Kate Sheehan guides me back to the front of the visitor center. She mentions in passing that she has to get to a meeting to discuss what the museum will do if this weird virus somehow gets here from Italy. She doesn’t seem that concerned.

Ten days later, on March 14, Plimoth Plantation opens for its 400th anniversary season. The very next day, the museum shuts back down—along with basically everything else.

* * * * *

Even without the coronavirus, the 400th anniversary never stood a chance of topping the 300th. America greeted that date with a level of spectacle that would put a Super Bowl to shame. The town of Plymouth hosted a pageant featuring nearly 1,400 actors; the country’s most famous composers provided the music and Robert Frost contributed to the script, which set the Pilgrims at the heart of an epic that transcended time. Among the cast were a group of Vikings, Sieur de Champlain, and Abraham Lincoln. Plymouth Rock itself even got a speaking role. “As one candle may light a thousand so the light here kindled hath shone to many, yea, in some sort to our whole nation,” the rock bellowed.

Across the country, politicians of every stripe offered up their praise. Massachusetts governor and soon-to-be-president Calvin Coolidge gave a speech in which he immodestly declared that the Pilgrims had not, in fact, sailed from England: “They sailed up out of the infinite.” He then equated the Pilgrims with the very notion of religious freedom and carved out a place for them in the broader Christian cosmology, as though the long road from Genesis to Revelations runs squarely through Plymouth Harbor.

“Civilization has made of their landing place a shrine,” Coolidge said. “Unto the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been entrusted the keeping of that shrine.” He argued, essentially, that remembering the Pilgrims was a sacred duty.

One hundred years later, a very different governor of Massachusetts declared it legally “nonessential.”

The museum shut its doors, and I shut mine. From quarantine, I tried to keep tabs on the anniversary online, but few people outside Plymouth were talking about it. History 400 years in the making will always lose out to history being written right this moment. No one seemed to have an appetite for debating what the Pilgrims mean to America today. The expected wave of newspaper op-eds decrying or defending the Pilgrims went unwritten and unmissed. I began to wonder if arguing about the past is a luxury of people not struggling to survive the present.

In the early days of the pandemic, the museum’s website struck a defiantly optimistic tone, continuing to sell tickets to tour the Mayflower upon its return in May. Then a news release quietly appeared announcing the furlough of most of the staff. Next the museum began soliciting donations to help make up for lost visitor revenue in a post distressingly titled “We’ll Be History Without You.”

Plymouth 400, the organization planning the celebrations in town, canceled its events through September. A smaller event that had been planned to celebrate the Mayflower’s visit to Boston in May was also scrapped. In their press release, organizers teased that the Mayflower might still be towed into Plymouth Harbor on schedule Memorial Day weekend.

Could that be true? I wondered. Would they really sneak the ship back when no one was looking? It would be a massive disappointment for the museum, but I couldn’t help but think that it would also be the most historically accurate way to do it. After all, when the original ship arrived in 1620, there was no one on shore to witness it. The only eyes present belonged to those on board, and they were undoubtedly looking west toward an unfamiliar land and an uncertain future.

The Mayflower’s Voyage

Dan Nance (dannance.com)

It’s a fair bet that on that day, not one of them speculated about how they’d be remembered centuries later. They were Calvinists—humble people who viewed the world as just a prelude to the infinite. When they thought of the future, they thought of their afterlife, not of their earthly posterity. If any of them could have seen that 300th anniversary gala, they probably would have condemned the spectacle as garish idolatry.

That’s the thing about making heroes out of historical figures: It’s rarely about them or what they would have wanted. We do this for ourselves. Humans have always had a weakness for heroic origin stories. They make us feel as if we’re inheritors of some great tradition. They also make the past seem simpler and more intentional. Ideally, we’d like the past to be like a tree—a great, linear trunk branching into innumerable stories, each connected and dependent upon that one perfect seed from which it all sprang.

But that’s a fantasy. The forces that shape the world are bigger than individuals, bigger than single moments. History isn’t a tree, it’s a meadow. It’s a million individual threads twining and unraveling in the wind. When you’re in the midst of it, it’s chaos. It’s only from a great distance that you can discern the shape of it—and fool yourself into believing that it is one single, coherent thing.

If the Mayflower had sunk in the North Atlantic, New England still would have been colonized. Native Americans still would have been killed or displaced. Democracy, religious freedom, revolution—none of these things were dependent on 100 soggy settlers stumbling onshore one chilly day in 1620.

Yet just because they weren’t the cause of these things, it doesn’t mean there’s no value in their story. It doesn’t mean we can’t learn something or feel some connection. In fact, during the darkest days of the pandemic, as I compulsively reloaded news websites and fretted with my sister about our parents’ safety, I understood the Pilgrims better than I ever had before. I could see them now not as heroes, not as founders, but as a confused bunch of people who, like me, were scared, focused on the present, and completely unable to predict what their lives would look like a year in the future.

They were then as we are now—lost in the weeds of a history that had yet to be written.

* * * * *

On Memorial Day weekend, no sails were spotted approaching Plymouth Harbor. News of the ship’s clandestine return proved to be just a rumor. The museum still hoped for a grand homecoming; it just wasn’t sure about when or how.

Plimoth Plantation opened its doors to the public on June 11, well ahead of most other museums. It had slipped into phase two of the Massachusetts reopening plan by arguing that as an open-air museum it functioned more like a botanical garden, and in those first days that seemed like an accurate description. During the quiet months, nature had taken steps toward reclaiming the land. The birds had returned in a number and variety that interpreters had never seen, and emboldened turtles had made nests across the grounds.

Visitors on opening day experienced a changed museum. Most interior spaces were barred to them (social distancing inside a thatched-roof cottage just isn’t feasible). Visitors could no longer roam the grounds freely, but were instead bound to a fixed path that minimized the chance of groups running into each other. Most notably, the Pilgrim village that the museum had spent so much effort making historically accurate was now littered with anachronisms: public safety signs, hand sanitizer stations, and, of course, masks.

Costumed reenactors on the job at Plimoth Planation’s 17th-century English village.

Christian Kozowyk

Kerri Helme, a veteran Wampanoag interpreter, is making the most of the new uniform requirements. She wears masks printed with squash blossoms and other native designs so they don’t clash so badly with her traditional deerskin clothing.

She works at the Wampanoag Homesite, a space set apart from the village. Unlike her Pilgrim coworkers, she is not in character. She never thinks twice about the present progressive tense, greeting visitors in plain English with a noticeable Boston accent.

Kerri and the other native interpreters aren’t bound to the year 1627. They wear the clothing their ancestors would have worn and they demonstrate traditional skills, but they’ll talk to you about anything. King Philip’s War, forced Christianization, the federal government’s ongoing attempts to strip away their Mashpee reservation—it’s all on the table and they genuinely want you to ask.

I ask her if those conversations are coming easier now, and she says they are. “I’m having a lot longer and more meaningful interactions with visitors,” she says. “I think people are seeking that more.”

While the museum was closed, the country changed in more ways than one. The killing of George Floyd sparked a national reassessment of our history. Protestors pulled statues from their pedestals. Whatever historical pause we experienced at the beginning of this crisis is over. Americans definitely want to argue about the past, and it’s only a matter of time before the Pilgrims have their moment.

But this isn’t all new. Kerri has worked at Plimoth Plantation for well over a decade, and she’s seen this change coming. People have become more informed about the history and more eager to hear the native perspective. Sometimes visitors come to her bragging that they just told off a Pilgrim. “And I think, Oh my gosh, the person they’re yelling at is such an ally to the Wampanoag people,” she says.

What the public doesn’t understand, Kerri says, is that she wants this story to be told. She wants you to see the whole picture. “This is the environment that our ancestors lived in,” she says. “We had allies, just like we do now, and we had enemies, a lot of enemies, too. We don’t want to play into painting a picture of it being some blissful situation here.”

This is the kind of history Plimoth Plantation likes to do. It shows you what the past was like, with all the warts and contradictions, and then, if you want, it gives you a chance to unpack it all.

This is what good history is. It’s what sets a museum apart from a monument. It acknowledges that historical figures, when they were alive, were just as flawed as we are today. More important, it acknowledges that historical figures are, in fact, dead. None of the praise or condemnation leveled at them ever reaches their ears. They don’t know, and they don’t care. All that’s left on this earth of the Pilgrims and everyone else from 1620 is the lingering consequences of their actions, both good and bad. We all feel them, whether we’re aware of them or not. The only way to understand the legacy of the past is to let go of the myths and the heroes and the simple stories and look bravely at the whole big ugly mess.

After the opening, I caught up with Richard Pickering, the deputy director of the museum, and asked if, after everything that had happened, the museum had adjusted its interpretation at all. He said no. The message is what it is, but he wonders if people will be more receptive to it now. “I think the experience we’ve had as Americans, seeing people either reach incredible heights of kindness, as was seen in Plymouth, or perform incredible acts of coldness, as was seen in Plymouth, we will now be able to understand the past better because of the tapestry of what we’ve been seeing over the last couple of months,” he says.

It’s an interesting thought. Will living through a tragic and divisive time make us more receptive to talking about tragic and divisive history? Maybe, but I think we have a long way to go. People may be toppling statues, but I don’t think we’re ready to topple the very idea of statues itself. I’m sure we’ll continue to divide history into heroes and villains. I’m sure we’ll continue in vain to balance truths atop pedestals. I’m sure we’ll continue to turn people into symbols and then argue about what those symbols mean.

When they see the Mayflower today, back at its berth once more, I think most people will still feel as though they have a binary choice, to either cheer for it or curse it. But I hope some will find a space in the middle. I hope some will come to see it not as a monument, not as a symbol, but as a frank acknowledgment of what happened and an invitation to have a long, painful, and honest conversation about everything that happened next. 


Sidebar: The Return of the Mayflower

The Mayflower II approaches Plymouth Harbor’s Bug Light en route to its home berth in August.

Courtesy of Plimoth Plantation

Greeted by hundreds of watercraft and more than 1,000 people on shore, the 64-year-old tall ship Mayflower II sailed back into Plymouth Harbor on August 10. For a glimpse into the three-year, multimillion-dollar restoration that preceded the ship’s return, look for Weekends with Yankee’s visit to Mystic Seaport in season 4 (episode 7, “Handmade in New England”). At the preservation shipyard there, we take a tour of the Mayflower and talk with Plimoth Plantation’s Whit Perry, who led the project that saw nearly 70 percent of the ship’s timbers, planking, structural frames, knees, and beams replaced. For more information and to find out how to watch the series, go to weekendswithyankee.com.


Thanksgiving... It is a tribute to God!

First published Thanksgiving 2008

Most stories of Thanksgiving history start with the harvest celebration of the pilgrims and the indians that took place in the autumn of 1621. Although they 1 did have a three-day feast in celebration of a good harvest, and the local indians did participate, this "first Thanksgiving" was not a holiday, simply a gathering. There is little evidence that this feast of thanks led directly to our modern Thanksgiving Day holiday. Thanksgiving can, however, be traced back to 1863 when Pres. Lincoln became the first president to proclaim Thanksgiving Day. The holiday has been a fixture of late November ever since.

However, since most school children are taught that the first Thanksgiving was held in 1621 with the pilgrims and indians, let us take a closer look at just what took place leading up to that event, and then what happened in the centuries afterward that finally gave us our modern Thanksgiving.2

The Pilgrims who sailed to this country aboard the Mayflower were originally members of the English Separatist Church. They were NOT the Puritans that we read so much about. Puritans did not believe in separting themselves from society, as the Pilgrims did. They had earlier fled their home in England and sailed to Holland (The Netherlands) to escape religious persecution. There, they enjoyed more religious tolerance, but they eventually became disenchanted with the Dutch way of life, thinking it ungodly. Seeking a better life, the Separatists negotiated with a London stock company to finance a pilgrimage to America. Most of those making the trip aboard the Mayflower were non-Separatists, but were hired to protect the company's interests. Only about one-third of the original colonists were Separatists.

 

 

Continue reading "Thanksgiving... It is a tribute to God!" »


12 graphs show mask mandates don't stop COVID

(The Federalist)

(The Federalist)

A dozen graphs charting the number of COVID-19 cases in countries and U.S. states confirm the conclusions of recent studies that mask mandates have no effect on the spread of the disease.

Yinon Weiss, a tech entrepreneur and U.S. military veteran who holds a degree in bioengineering from the University of California at Berkeley, pointed out in an analysis for The Federalist that after the initial panic over predictions that millions of Americans would die, the Centers for Disease Control currently estimates a COVID-19 survival rate of 99.99 percent for people younger than 50.

"It is likely that some politicians eventually realized their mistake and needed a way to back-pedal without admitting their lockdowns were a policy disaster," he wrote. "Their solution was for people to put any old piece of cloth across their face and magically believe that it’s okay to go out shopping again."

Weiss said the "mask dogma had many cracks in it from the start, noting the U.S. surgeon general and the Centers for Disease Control both said early in the pandemic that "masks are NOT effective in preventing [the] general public from catching coronavirus."

 

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A Stolen Election Part 1

An election was held on November 3rd and America lost. We lost our right to determine our leaders, we lost the right of freedom and democracy, and we lost our nation to foreign rulers. All, by the way predicted by God would happen to us.  Today is Part 1, just HEADLINES on what we lost.  Tomorrow, in Part 2 the conclusion, and what we can expect.

 


The foolishness of those mask wearers

“By wearing a mask, the exhaled viruses will not be able to escape and will concentrate in the nasal passages, enter the olfactory nerves and travel into the brain.” — Russell Blaylock, MD

Bob Barney

image from external-content.duckduckgo.comI get a laugh out of the people wearing masks, because big brother told them too.  You see them wearing them while driving their cars - alone, you see them walking in the woods, or on a country road- alone, and you see them in their own homes - alone!  America has truly become a dumbed down nation, as the Bible predicted when God said, "My people die because of lack of knowledge.". That's more true than ever ! Your God tells you in His personal book written for you, called the Holy Bible, that you are dying, because of your lack of knowledge!  Our leaders have failed us. In fact, the despise us! They want to enslave us, and forcing us to wear a mask, they know that by doing so, we will actually become sicker, and even more dependent on them! They know that masks kill, that's why we keep seeing pictures of these leaders caught without wearing them!  WAKE UP AMERICA!  Your election was stolen, your private information has been stolen, and your health is being taken away by a lie.  You have become slaves!

Global Research published findings that should shock you!  It should make you mad, mad enough to want to kill those doing this to your loved ones.  Make no mistake, your leaders want to kill you!

Researchers found that about a third of the workers developed headaches with use of the mask, most had preexisting headaches that were worsened by the mask wearing, and 60% required pain medications for relief. As to the cause of the headaches, while straps and pressure from the mask could be causative, the bulk of the evidence points toward hypoxia and/or hypercapnia as the cause. That is, a reduction in blood oxygenation (hypoxia) or an elevation in blood C02 (hypercapnia).

It is known that the N95 mask, if worn for hours, can reduce blood oxygenation as much as 20%, which can lead to a loss of consciousness, as happened to the hapless fellow driving around alone in his car wearing an N95 mask, causing him to pass out, and to crash his car and sustain injuries. I am sure that we have several cases of elderly individuals or any person with poor lung function passing out, hitting their head. This, of course, can lead to death.

A more recent study involving 159 healthcare workers aged 21 to 35 years of age found that 81% developed headaches from wearing a face mask.   Some had pre-existing headaches that were precipitated by the masks. All felt like the headaches affected their work performance.

Unfortunately, no one is telling the frail elderly and those with lung diseases, such as COPD, emphysema or pulmonary fibrosis, of these dangers when wearing a facial mask of any kind—which can cause a severe worsening of lung function. This also includes lung cancer patients and people having had lung surgery, especially with partial resection or even the removal of a whole lung.

 

The importance of these findings is that a drop in oxygen levels (hypoxia) is associated with an impairment in immunity. Studies have shown that hypoxia can inhibit the type of main immune cells used to fight viral infections called the CD4+ T-lymphocyte. This occurs because the hypoxia increases the level of a compound called hypoxia inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which inhibits T-lymphocytes and stimulates a powerful immune inhibitor cell called the Tregs. This sets the stage for contracting any infection, including COVID-19 and making the consequences of that infection much graver. In essence, your mask may very well put you at an increased risk of infections and if so, having a much worse outcome.

People with cancer, especially if the cancer has spread, will be at a further risk from prolonged hypoxia as the cancer grows best in a microenvironment that is low in oxygen. Low oxygen also promotes inflammation which can promote the growth, invasion and spread of cancers.  Repeated episodes of hypoxia have been proposed as a significant factor in atherosclerosis and hence increases all cardiovascular (heart attacks) and cerebrovascular (strokes) diseases.

There is another danger to wearing these masks on a daily basis, especially if worn for several hours. When a person is infected with a respiratory virus, they will expel some of the virus with each breath. If they are wearing a mask, especially an N95 mask or other tightly fitting mask, they will be constantly rebreathing the viruses, raising the concentration of the virus in the lungs and the nasal passages. We know that people who have the worst reactions to the coronavirus have the highest concentrations of the virus early on. And this leads to the deadly cytokine storm in a selected number.

It gets even more frightening. Newer evidence suggests that in some cases the virus can enter the brain. In most instances it enters the brain by way of the olfactory nerves (smell nerves), which connect directly with the area of the brain dealing with recent memory and memory consolidation. By wearing a mask, the exhaled viruses will not be able to escape and will concentrate in the nasal passages, enter the olfactory nerves and travel into the brain.”

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Note to readers: please click HERE or below. Forward this article to your email lists. Crosspost on your blog site, internet forums. etc.

Dr. Russell Blaylock, author of The Blaylock Wellness Report newsletter, is a nationally recognized board-certified neurosurgeon, health practitioner, author, and lecturer. He attended the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and completed his internship and neurological residency at the Medical University of South Carolina. For 26 years, practiced neurosurgery in addition to having a nutritional practice. He recently retired from his neurosurgical duties to devote his full attention to nutritional research. Dr. Blaylock has authored four books, Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills, Health and Nutrition Secrets That Can Save Your Life, Natural Strategies for Cancer Patients, and his most recent work, Cellular and Molecular Biology of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

 

MY VIEW: Patriots Refuse to wear Masks that don't even work!

Masks are a symbol of slavery. I have been saying that for months now... Glad Barr agrees.  The Deep State in collusion with the medical community has trashed the Bill of Rights, and your freedom!  We are right now slaves to evil- if we wear masks.   Just like Jews being forced to wear yellow stars!

image from www.theplaintruth.com

Here is a great commentary by: by Jason Gold

The debate over mask wearing because of Covid has become a passionate and in some cases a positively combustible debate with mask shamings, assaults, even shootings by disturbed mask wearers on non-maskers.  If you're pressed for time and need to move on, here's my two cents, in brief:

1. Masks don't work. Unless you have a plastic face shield as part of a hazmat suit or a gas mask with its own oxygen supply, cloth, cotton, N95 masks are an exercise in futility. Why? Basic math. The porosity of all of these masks are on average 0.3 microns, in order to to allow you to breathe. The diameter of the Covid virus is 0.1 microns, so we have a failure on a basic math and structural level. These masks were not designed to stop viruses from getting in or going out but to stop bacteria which are about 1000 times larger.  Also, most of these have no seal around the face and nose which allows for breathing leakage.  Why do you think surgeons wear them in surgery? Not to stop viruses. It can't. It stops bacteria from the surgeon's mouth and nose from getting into the surgical field. The mask coupled with sterile room conditions and laminar flow ventilation is quite good at that. But viruses? Pfft.
2. If the virus is so deadly why aren't there hazmat cans for disposing of them with hand washing stations everywhere? If they work, why are prisoners being released instead of giving them masks? If they work, why do we need social distancing? If social distancing works, why do we need masks? Why are cloth masks, paper masks, kerchiefs, scarves, any old face covering acceptable? Why are the rates of infection sky-high in Muslim countries where at least 50% of the population (women) have perpetual face coverings?
3. Wearing masks for prolonged periods of time are detrimental to your health.  You are re-breathing your expelled CO2, you are re-breathing your own germs. You are causing your O2 saturation to drop, setting you up for a stroke, heart attack or just good old loss of consciousness, which is exactly what has been happening to drivers who wear them while driving and pass out.
4. Two recent studies, one in the New England Journal of Medicine and one in the British Medical Journal, as well as a soon to be published one from Holland, conclude masks have little if any value, with cloth worse than surgical.
5. Conclusion? Masks are useless. It's not about our health. It's about control. But try using these rational arguments on brainwashed Karens and Kens.

Now for the good stuff.

A few weeks ago, The Wabasha County Republican Party posted a meme on their FaceBook page (whether it was deliberate or a "hack" as they later claimed is debatable) that compared mask mandates to the infamous yellow stars that Hitler YMS, made the Jews wear in Nazi Germany. The image is below.


In addition Dane Hicks, owner and publisher of The Anderson County Review in Kansas, posted an anti-mask image of her, superimposed upon a picture of the Holocaust that showed the following:

 

 

The knee-jerk reaction of Jews to both of these was entirely predictable. The usual cries of racism, bigotry, anti-Semitism, insensitivity, etc. rang out across the land. Both groups apologized, though I tend to believe Hicks' apology was more heartfelt.  And yes, I agree that the use of the Holocaust imagery was somewhat over the top. Yet, while the Jews were busy being offended, they missed the entire point of both these incidents.  Masks via forced mandate with no science to back it up, IS the new yellow star. The parallels could hardly be more striking.


There is a particular lesson that can be learned from Hitler's strategy to have have Jews in Nazi Germany wear the infamous yellow stars. Hitler could not just wipe out the Jews right away. He had a three pronged strategy. Denigrate, dehumanize and then destroy. Of course this was after he first took away all the guns from the population, disbanded all local police, destroyed historical statues and had book burnings.  Sound familiar? But I digress. Once the Jews were no longer considered human, it would be much easier to find his willing accomplices in the German population. The yellow star was part of that strategy. It showed that Jews were property, cattle, sub-human, untermenschen, to be done with as the state pleased.

Mask-wearing is the product of illegal and unconstitutional mandates imposed by power-hungry (and in some cases, elder killer mass murderers in the Hitlerian tradition), elected officials (almost all Democrats) in order to keep people controlled, docile, fearful and obedient.  This is a prime example of obedience conditioning that history shows is necessary for the imposition of any Marxist/socialist/fascist agenda. If challenged on a federal level all the mandates would be tossed for lack of scientific evidence as well as imposition of freedoms. But in the meantime, acceptance means you have been sub-humanized, you are not in control of taking care of your own health, you are a victim of a capricious act on your freedom and on your individuality. You are property. You are less than human.

So why the Yellow Star analogy of masks if it applies to non-Jews as well? NY was the epicenter of the virus nationwide with more than 40% of the cases occurring here and more than 30,000.00 dead due to gross negligence and incompetence of the government as well as criminally-negligent homicide on the part of Governor Cuomo as it relates to the nursing homes.  The initial high-profile cases occurred in the Jewish communities of New Rochelle, the 5 Towns, the epicenter of the modern orthodox communities. Modern Orthodox, Reform, and Conservative Jews have a particular pathology of trying to be "more Catholic than the pope" and be good citizens and listen to the government, no mater how outrageous or illegal the mandates because they are concerned of what the goyim think. So they have rushed to embrace mask wearing, social distancing, fracturing of the shuls and embracing the Zoom life to be good citizens of the state, or good sheeple. 

The Jewish communities in the tri-state area absorbed a heavy blow from Covid because of our density, our social interactivity and interconnectedness which spread an engineered virus more infectious than the flu, but with the same lethality profile.  However, despite the media's best effort to bury the story, the herd immunity rate in NY by now, is north of 70% as a report last month showed. Which means all of this, masks, social distancing the lockdown is now a complete sham.

People ask me, "Ok what's the big deal? It's only a mask, right? It makes people feel better, like they have some protection. Thats a good thing, right?" Sure, but remember it was a lockdown to protect all the elderly and save the ventilators until the bad modeling and faulty data showed it wasn't. It was just two weeks. Until it wasn't. It was to flatten the curve. Until it wasn't. Then it was until there were no new cases. Until it wasn't. Now its some states (Democrat, of courseI) saying they can’t open till there's a vaccine. What's next? "Health Passes" that allow freedom of travel only if someone is vaccinated or can prove immunity? How did it go in Nazi Germany? “May I see your papers, please”?  If the masks are the yellow stars then mandatory vaccines just might be the tattoo.  Compliance is not a virtue. It’s cowardice. Wake up folks, realize you are being played or here is a meme that might turn out to be prescient.

 

also:

'Take off your mask!': Florida protesters sporting MAGA t-shirts and hats defy COVID rules and march maskless through Target store

Social media footage shows a small group of anti-maskers (left) marching through the aisles of the retailer's store (inset) on North Federal Highway in Fort Lauderdale. The group, many of them sporting 'Make America Great Again' t-shirts and hats, are seen shouting 'take it off' at other customers. Footage outside the store showed a man ranting about being 'sick and tired of having to wear one of these things' and throwing a mask to the ground (right). One anti-masker present Cristina Gomez first hit headlines in June when she claimed people wearing masks were 'obeying the devil's laws'. Florida does not have a statewide mask mandate but several businesses - including Target - have rules requiring customers and staff to sport face masks. A total of 196,752 Americans have been died and 6.6 million have

 

 


Coronavirus and American Fears - we are ripe for defeat

Bob Barney

Curses-deut-28For many years I have been writing about the identity of America, and much of the nations of the world, found in the pages of the Bible.   This last Friday the 13th, I reposted the "Friday the 13th" article on just what the #13 symbolizes in the Bible...  

With the advent of the coronavirus, another prophecy of God is coming true.  That is of needless panic and fears, not based in reality but in fear!  God says we will act like a woman in labor pains, "They trembled all over like women giving birth."

What we are witnessing today is the 'woosification' of America. God says men will act like women, in great fear, when in fact there should be no fear! In Leviticus 26, God says this:" I will demoralize you in the land of your enemies. You will live in such fear that the sound of a leaf driven by the wind will send you fleeing. You will run as though fleeing from a sword, and you will fall even when no one pursues you. 37 Though no one is chasing you, you will stumble over each other as though fleeing from a sword. You will have no power to stand up against your enemies. 38 You will die among the foreign nations and be devoured in the land of your enemies. 39 Those of you who survive will waste away in your enemies’ lands because of their sins and the sins of their ancestors."

This is what is happening today with this COLD VIRUS (cause that is what it is) is doing to our nation and the entire Western World.

What this tells our enemies:

 

Continue reading "Coronavirus and American Fears - we are ripe for defeat" »


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HEADLINES & STORIES FROM AROUND THE WORLD: Week-45
2020
Nov 15-21
News Stories from Across The World:
Wednesday: 
China 'used secret microwave pulse weapon to cook Indian soldiers alive' and force them into retreat during Himalayan border battle-The electromagnetic weapons which cook the human tissue of enemy troops 'turned the mountain tops into a microwave oven' and made the Indian soldiers vomit, international studies expert Jin Canrong told his students in Beijing. The professor hailed the Chinese forces for 'beautifully' executing the move which cleared out Indian troops without violating a ban on gunfire along the disputed mountain border. The weapons were said to have been deployed in late August, weeks after a deadly brawl involving rocks and clubs which killed at least 20 Indian soldiers in the worst fighting on the border in 53 years.
 
Tuesday:

Monday:
 
Sunday: