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Doomsday prediction for surging tides was WRONG

Study claims ice-cliffs of Antarctica will be responsible for just a 6-inch boost in sea levels - SEVEN times less than previously thought (but it will still cause 'climate chaos')

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Predictions of an imminent and catastrophic surge in sea levels were incorrect and overestimated, a new study has found. The difference between the two predictions stems from disagreement as to how significant the melting of the Antarctic ice-cliffs (pictured) will be to global levels

Predictions of an imminent and catastrophic surge in sea levels were incorrect and overestimated, a new study has found. 

The difference between the two predictions stems from disagreement as to how significant the melting of the Antarctic ice-cliffs will be to global levels.

New research says there is only a five per cent chance that the Antarctic ice-cliff melting will contribute more than 15 inches (39 cm) to global sea levels by 2100.

Previous estimates stated it could contribute a huge 44 inches (1.14 metres) alone - more than seven times the revised value of between 5.5 - 6 inches (14 – 15 centimetres). 

The latest study found that, by the end of this century, global sea levels will rise by a grand total of less than four feet (120 cm), noticeably less dramatic than the doomsday predictions of a 2016 paper from US-based scientists that estimated it would exceed 6.5 feet (two metres).   

But, a separate study published by the same scientists found future generations still face a significant fallout from global warming and wilder weather due to 'climate chaos' - even if the previous doomsday prediction was inaccurate. 

Dr Tamsin Edwards, lecturer in physical geography at King's and lead author of the study published in Nature, said: 'Unstable ice cliffs in Antarctica were proposed as a cause of unstoppable collapse of large parts of the ice sheet in the past. 

'They were, therefore, also predicted to cause rapidly rising seas with global warming in our near future. But we've re-analysed the data and found this isn't the case.'  

This would take the combined total for sea level rise to a grand total of 47 inches (120 cm), far less than the previous estimate of more than two metres. 

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