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Deadly Insect-Borne Disease Outbreaks Linked to DDT Ban, Not Global Warming

NOTE: DDT was not as effective after a generation as it was initially. This is not mentioned in this report.  As for ticks, we didn't have millions of deer protected by animal rights groups in the 1930-40-50-60's.

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The CDC is working with Florida health officials to investigate what could …
AP Photo/Andre Penner, File

The video, published by nonprofit public policy research institute Just Facts, describes the research the institute did this year on the claim by Politico that the surge in deadly insect-borne diseases is due to “warming global temperatures.”

For a special issue of Politico about “planetary health,” reporter Christina Animashaun created a graphic on “climate change and human disease” that states:

Warming global temperatures are changing the range and behavior of disease-carrying insects like mosquitos and ticks and extending the seasons in which they are active. As a result, incidence of the diseases they carry—including Lyme, spotted fever, West Nile and malaria—are all on the rise, despite yearly fluctuations.

However, as the research institute points out, the “U.S. Global Change Resource Program’s Climate Health Assessment” the Politico author cites does not actually support her claim.

“Though there are links between climate and tick distribution, studies that look for links between weather and geographical differences in human infection rates do not show a clear or consistent link between temperature and Lyme disease incidence,” the assessment states.

 

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